Backcountry Treks

Lander Llama

Western Wyoming is home to one of the most spectacular – and oldest – mountain ranges in the world, the Wild River Range, filled with cathedral-like granite mountains, thousands of glacial lakes and forests, and abundant fish, wildlife…and llamas. These gentle, sure-footed creatures native to the Andes Mountains of South America are perfect for the rugged terrain of the Wild River Range, Absaroka Range and Red Desert of Wyoming.

Just south of the Wind River Indian Reservation is the city of Lander, a tourism center with several dude ranches nearby. Lander is also home to the Lander Llama Company, based out of a working llama ranch run by Scott and Therese Woodruff since 1985. They offer guided and non-guided wilderness pack trips (on llamas) in addition to high mountain trout fishing and fly fishing, wilderness hiking, photography, and wildflower and wildlife viewing. Visit www.wyominghiking.com for more information.

Skiing Jackson Hole and Grand Targhee backcountry

Jackson Hole is usually associated with the ski resort, but it’s actually a valley encompassed by the Teton Mountains and occupied mostly by the Grand Teton National Park, which lies in the heart of Jackson Hole. Abundant wildlife make the area a favorite tourist destination, and the steep, challenging terrain of the mountains – including one of North America’s highest vertical drop of 1,262 meters – draws many skiers and boarders. Visitors enjoy plenty of other outdoor activities in both the winter and summer, including dog sledding, snowshoeing, snowmobiling, balloon rides, paragliding, fishing, hiking, biking and mountain climbing. Visit www.jacksonhole.com for more information on Jackson Hole skiing and other outdoor adventures.
Powder hounds looking to escape the lifts and noise of Jackson won’t find a more exciting way to experience backcountry skiing and snowboarding than in Wyoming’s untracked slopes in Grand Targhee. Located on the western side of the Tetons and an hour’s drive from Jackson, Targhee gets more snow than almost any other resort in the country – and there isn’t a single snowmaking machine on the mountain. Storms traveling eastward from the Pacific often get “stuck” on the west side of the massive Tetons and dump twice as much powder there as on the eastern side of the range (more than 500 inches annually). As a result, Targhee’s un-crowded and wide-open terrain is perfect for those looking to safely explore the unique experience of heading into the wilderness on skis or a snowboard. Many outfitters offer guided full-day or half-day tours customized to match the fitness level and needs of participants and include instruction on backcountry techniques, safety practices and more. 

Secret Yellowstone: Backcountry Camping

Yellowstone National Park encompasses 2.2 million acres, which means there’s way more to discover beyond Old Faithful, Mammoth and the North Geyser Basin. Backcountry camping is arguably the best way to experience the most popular national park in America away from the crowds, with plenty of trails and a designated backcountry campsite system. Visitors can join an off-the-beaten-path camping pack trip offered by a local outfitter, or explore on their own areas such as Yellowstone Lake (one of the world’s largest freshwater lakes above 7,000 feet elevation), Canyon Village, Hellroaring Creek and Yellowstone River. 
It’s a Yurt Spurt!

Filling a gap between roughing it in a tent and staying in an RV, yurts have increased in popularity at campgrounds nationwide. These circular lodgings are often built with wooden or canvas walls and offer a surprising amount of coziness against the elements. Often large enough to sleep five or six people, yurts typically are furnished with beds, so there’s no need to lug around air mattresses or bulky cots. Vacationing in a yurt provides the perfect amount of rustic experience, particularly for those new to the outdoors, without the hassle of setting up a tent for the night.

Yurts are a great way to add a unique twist to any Wyoming vacation, allowing travelers to escape the crowds and truly experience what it’s like to spend time in the backcountry. Many outfitters offer trips ranging from a couple days to a week, but most will accommodate any schedule travelers are interested in. Additionally, the comfort of yurts, particularly those that are heated, means travelers can take a camping trip any time of the year. So while the weather may not be as appealing in the winter, the campgrounds and surrounding towns will be quieter, offering a different type of vacation experience.
Lander Llama

Western Wyoming is home to one of the most spectacular – and oldest – mountain ranges in the world, the Wild River Range, filled with cathedral-like granite mountains, thousands of glacial lakes and forests, and abundant fish, wildlife…and llamas. These gentle, sure-footed creatures native to the Andes Mountains of South America are perfect for the rugged terrain of the Wild River Range, Absaroka Range and Red Desert of Wyoming.

Just south of the Wind River Indian Reservation is the city of Lander, a tourism center with several dude ranches nearby. Lander is also home to the Lander Llama Company, based out of a working llama ranch run by Scott and Therese Woodruff since 1985. They offer guided and non-guided wilderness pack trips (on llamas) in addition to high mountain trout fishing and fly fishing, wilderness hiking, photography, and wildflower and wildlife viewing. Visit www.wyominghiking.com for more information.

Skiing Jackson Hole and Grand Targhee backcountry

Jackson Hole is usually associated with the ski resort, but it’s actually a valley encompassed by the Teton Mountains and occupied mostly by the Grand Teton National Park, which lies in the heart of Jackson Hole. Abundant wildlife make the area a favorite tourist destination, and the steep, challenging terrain of the mountains – including one of North America’s highest vertical drop of 1,262 meters – draws many skiers and boarders. Visitors enjoy plenty of other outdoor activities in both the winter and summer, including dog sledding, snowshoeing, snowmobiling, balloon rides, paragliding, fishing, hiking, biking and mountain climbing. Visit www.jacksonhole.com for more information on Jackson Hole skiing and other outdoor adventures.
Powder hounds looking to escape the lifts and noise of Jackson won’t find a more exciting way to experience backcountry skiing and snowboarding than in Wyoming’s untracked slopes in Grand Targhee. Located on the western side of the Tetons and an hour’s drive from Jackson, Targhee gets more snow than almost any other resort in the country – and there isn’t a single snowmaking machine on the mountain. Storms traveling eastward from the Pacific often get “stuck” on the west side of the massive Tetons and dump twice as much powder there as on the eastern side of the range (more than 500 inches annually). As a result, Targhee’s un-crowded and wide-open terrain is perfect for those looking to safely explore the unique experience of heading into the wilderness on skis or a snowboard. Many outfitters offer guided full-day or half-day tours customized to match the fitness level and needs of participants and include instruction on backcountry techniques, safety practices and more. 

Secret Yellowstone: Backcountry Camping

Yellowstone National Park encompasses 2.2 million acres, which means there’s way more to discover beyond Old Faithful, Mammoth and the North Geyser Basin. Backcountry camping is arguably the best way to experience the most popular national park in America away from the crowds, with plenty of trails and a designated backcountry campsite system. Visitors can join an off-the-beaten-path camping pack trip offered by a local outfitter, or explore on their own areas such as Yellowstone Lake (one of the world’s largest freshwater lakes above 7,000 feet elevation), Canyon Village, Hellroaring Creek and Yellowstone River. 
It’s a Yurt Spurt!

Filling a gap between roughing it in a tent and staying in an RV, yurts have increased in popularity at campgrounds nationwide. These circular lodgings are often built with wooden or canvas walls and offer a surprising amount of coziness against the elements. Often large enough to sleep five or six people, yurts typically are furnished with beds, so there’s no need to lug around air mattresses or bulky cots. Vacationing in a yurt provides the perfect amount of rustic experience, particularly for those new to the outdoors, without the hassle of setting up a tent for the night.

Yurts are a great way to add a unique twist to any Wyoming vacation, allowing travelers to escape the crowds and truly experience what it’s like to spend time in the backcountry. Many outfitters offer trips ranging from a couple days to a week, but most will accommodate any schedule travelers are interested in. Additionally, the comfort of yurts, particularly those that are heated, means travelers can take a camping trip any time of the year. So while the weather may not be as appealing in the winter, the campgrounds and surrounding towns will be quieter, offering a different type of vacation experience.
Lander Llama

Western Wyoming is home to one of the most spectacular – and oldest – mountain ranges in the world, the Wild River Range, filled with cathedral-like granite mountains, thousands of glacial lakes and forests, and abundant fish, wildlife…and llamas. These gentle, sure-footed creatures native to the Andes Mountains of South America are perfect for the rugged terrain of the Wild River Range, Absaroka Range and Red Desert of Wyoming.

Just south of the Wind River Indian Reservation is the city of Lander, a tourism center with several dude ranches nearby. Lander is also home to the Lander Llama Company, based out of a working llama ranch run by Scott and Therese Woodruff since 1985. They offer guided and non-guided wilderness pack trips (on llamas) in addition to high mountain trout fishing and fly fishing, wilderness hiking, photography, and wildflower and wildlife viewing. Visit www.wyominghiking.com for more information.

Skiing Jackson Hole and Grand Targhee backcountry

Jackson Hole is usually associated with the ski resort, but it’s actually a valley encompassed by the Teton Mountains and occupied mostly by the Grand Teton National Park, which lies in the heart of Jackson Hole. Abundant wildlife make the area a favorite tourist destination, and the steep, challenging terrain of the mountains – including one of North America’s highest vertical drop of 1,262 meters – draws many skiers and boarders. Visitors enjoy plenty of other outdoor activities in both the winter and summer, including dog sledding, snowshoeing, snowmobiling, balloon rides, paragliding, fishing, hiking, biking and mountain climbing. Visit www.jacksonhole.com for more information on Jackson Hole skiing and other outdoor adventures.
Powder hounds looking to escape the lifts and noise of Jackson won’t find a more exciting way to experience backcountry skiing and snowboarding than in Wyoming’s untracked slopes in Grand Targhee. Located on the western side of the Tetons and an hour’s drive from Jackson, Targhee gets more snow than almost any other resort in the country – and there isn’t a single snowmaking machine on the mountain. Storms traveling eastward from the Pacific often get “stuck” on the west side of the massive Tetons and dump twice as much powder there as on the eastern side of the range (more than 500 inches annually). As a result, Targhee’s un-crowded and wide-open terrain is perfect for those looking to safely explore the unique experience of heading into the wilderness on skis or a snowboard. Many outfitters offer guided full-day or half-day tours customized to match the fitness level and needs of participants and include instruction on backcountry techniques, safety practices and more. 

Secret Yellowstone: Backcountry Camping

Yellowstone National Park encompasses 2.2 million acres, which means there’s way more to discover beyond Old Faithful, Mammoth and the North Geyser Basin. Backcountry camping is arguably the best way to experience the most popular national park in America away from the crowds, with plenty of trails and a designated backcountry campsite system. Visitors can join an off-the-beaten-path camping pack trip offered by a local outfitter, or explore on their own areas such as Yellowstone Lake (one of the world’s largest freshwater lakes above 7,000 feet elevation), Canyon Village, Hellroaring Creek and Yellowstone River. 
It’s a Yurt Spurt!

Filling a gap between roughing it in a tent and staying in an RV, yurts have increased in popularity at campgrounds nationwide. These circular lodgings are often built with wooden or canvas walls and offer a surprising amount of coziness against the elements. Often large enough to sleep five or six people, yurts typically are furnished with beds, so there’s no need to lug around air mattresses or bulky cots. Vacationing in a yurt provides the perfect amount of rustic experience, particularly for those new to the outdoors, without the hassle of setting up a tent for the night.

Yurts are a great way to add a unique twist to any Wyoming vacation, allowing travelers to escape the crowds and truly experience what it’s like to spend time in the backcountry. Many outfitters offer trips ranging from a couple days to a week, but most will accommodate any schedule travelers are interested in. Additionally, the comfort of yurts, particularly those that are heated, means travelers can take a camping trip any time of the year. So while the weather may not be as appealing in the winter, the campgrounds and surrounding towns will be quieter, offering a different type of vacation experience.
Skiing Jackson Hole and Grand Targhee backcountry

Jackson Hole is usually associated with the ski resort, but it’s actually a valley encompassed by the Teton Mountains and occupied mostly by the Grand Teton National Park, which lies in the heart of Jackson Hole. Abundant wildlife make the area a favorite tourist destination, and the steep, challenging terrain of the mountains – including one of North America’s highest vertical drop of 1,262 meters – draws many skiers and boarders. Visitors enjoy plenty of other outdoor activities in both the winter and summer, including dog sledding, snowshoeing, snowmobiling, balloon rides, paragliding, fishing, hiking, biking and mountain climbing. Visit www.jacksonhole.com for more information on Jackson Hole skiing and other outdoor adventures.
Powder hounds looking to escape the lifts and noise of Jackson won’t find a more exciting way to experience backcountry skiing and snowboarding than in Wyoming’s untracked slopes in Grand Targhee. Located on the western side of the Tetons and an hour’s drive from Jackson, Targhee gets more snow than almost any other resort in the country – and there isn’t a single snowmaking machine on the mountain. Storms traveling eastward from the Pacific often get “stuck” on the west side of the massive Tetons and dump twice as much powder there as on the eastern side of the range (more than 500 inches annually). As a result, Targhee’s un-crowded and wide-open terrain is perfect for those looking to safely explore the unique experience of heading into the wilderness on skis or a snowboard. Many outfitters offer guided full-day or half-day tours customized to match the fitness level and needs of participants and include instruction on backcountry techniques, safety practices and more. 

Secret Yellowstone: Backcountry Camping

Yellowstone National Park encompasses 2.2 million acres, which means there’s way more to discover beyond Old Faithful, Mammoth and the North Geyser Basin. Backcountry camping is arguably the best way to experience the most popular national park in America away from the crowds, with plenty of trails and a designated backcountry campsite system. Visitors can join an off-the-beaten-path camping pack trip offered by a local outfitter, or explore on their own areas such as Yellowstone Lake (one of the world’s largest freshwater lakes above 7,000 feet elevation), Canyon Village, Hellroaring Creek and Yellowstone River. 
It’s a Yurt Spurt!

Filling a gap between roughing it in a tent and staying in an RV, yurts have increased in popularity at campgrounds nationwide. These circular lodgings are often built with wooden or canvas walls and offer a surprising amount of coziness against the elements. Often large enough to sleep five or six people, yurts typically are furnished with beds, so there’s no need to lug around air mattresses or bulky cots. Vacationing in a yurt provides the perfect amount of rustic experience, particularly for those new to the outdoors, without the hassle of setting up a tent for the night.

Yurts are a great way to add a unique twist to any Wyoming vacation, allowing travelers to escape the crowds and truly experience what it’s like to spend time in the backcountry. Many outfitters offer trips ranging from a couple days to a week, but most will accommodate any schedule travelers are interested in. Additionally, the comfort of yurts, particularly those that are heated, means travelers can take a camping trip any time of the year. So while the weather may not be as appealing in the winter, the campgrounds and surrounding towns will be quieter, offering a different type of vacation experience.
Skiing Jackson Hole and Grand Targhee backcountry

Jackson Hole is usually associated with the ski resort, but it’s actually a valley encompassed by the Teton Mountains and occupied mostly by the Grand Teton National Park, which lies in the heart of Jackson Hole. Abundant wildlife make the area a favorite tourist destination, and the steep, challenging terrain of the mountains – including one of North America’s highest vertical drop of 1,262 meters – draws many skiers and boarders. Visitors enjoy plenty of other outdoor activities in both the winter and summer, including dog sledding, snowshoeing, snowmobiling, balloon rides, paragliding, fishing, hiking, biking and mountain climbing. Visit www.jacksonhole.com for more information on Jackson Hole skiing and other outdoor adventures.
Powder hounds looking to escape the lifts and noise of Jackson won’t find a more exciting way to experience backcountry skiing and snowboarding than in Wyoming’s untracked slopes in Grand Targhee. Located on the western side of the Tetons and an hour’s drive from Jackson, Targhee gets more snow than almost any other resort in the country – and there isn’t a single snowmaking machine on the mountain. Storms traveling eastward from the Pacific often get “stuck” on the west side of the massive Tetons and dump twice as much powder there as on the eastern side of the range (more than 500 inches annually). As a result, Targhee’s un-crowded and wide-open terrain is perfect for those looking to safely explore the unique experience of heading into the wilderness on skis or a snowboard. Many outfitters offer guided full-day or half-day tours customized to match the fitness level and needs of participants and include instruction on backcountry techniques, safety practices and more. 

Secret Yellowstone: Backcountry Camping

Yellowstone National Park encompasses 2.2 million acres, which means there’s way more to discover beyond Old Faithful, Mammoth and the North Geyser Basin. Backcountry camping is arguably the best way to experience the most popular national park in America away from the crowds, with plenty of trails and a designated backcountry campsite system. Visitors can join an off-the-beaten-path camping pack trip offered by a local outfitter, or explore on their own areas such as Yellowstone Lake (one of the world’s largest freshwater lakes above 7,000 feet elevation), Canyon Village, Hellroaring Creek and Yellowstone River. 
It’s a Yurt Spurt!

Filling a gap between roughing it in a tent and staying in an RV, yurts have increased in popularity at campgrounds nationwide. These circular lodgings are often built with wooden or canvas walls and offer a surprising amount of coziness against the elements. Often large enough to sleep five or six people, yurts typically are furnished with beds, so there’s no need to lug around air mattresses or bulky cots. Vacationing in a yurt provides the perfect amount of rustic experience, particularly for those new to the outdoors, without the hassle of setting up a tent for the night.

Yurts are a great way to add a unique twist to any Wyoming vacation, allowing travelers to escape the crowds and truly experience what it’s like to spend time in the backcountry. Many outfitters offer trips ranging from a couple days to a week, but most will accommodate any schedule travelers are interested in. Additionally, the comfort of yurts, particularly those that are heated, means travelers can take a camping trip any time of the year. So while the weather may not be as appealing in the winter, the campgrounds and surrounding towns will be quieter, offering a different type of vacation experience.
Skiing Jackson Hole and Grand Targhee backcountry

Jackson Hole is usually associated with the ski resort, but it’s actually a valley encompassed by the Teton Mountains and occupied mostly by the Grand Teton National Park, which lies in the heart of Jackson Hole. Abundant wildlife make the area a favorite tourist destination, and the steep, challenging terrain of the mountains – including one of North America’s highest vertical drop of 1,262 meters – draws many skiers and boarders. Visitors enjoy plenty of other outdoor activities in both the winter and summer, including dog sledding, snowshoeing, snowmobiling, balloon rides, paragliding, fishing, hiking, biking and mountain climbing. Visit www.jacksonhole.com for more information on Jackson Hole skiing and other outdoor adventures.
Powder hounds looking to escape the lifts and noise of Jackson won’t find a more exciting way to experience backcountry skiing and snowboarding than in Wyoming’s untracked slopes in Grand Targhee. Located on the western side of the Tetons and an hour’s drive from Jackson, Targhee gets more snow than almost any other resort in the country – and there isn’t a single snowmaking machine on the mountain. Storms traveling eastward from the Pacific often get “stuck” on the west side of the massive Tetons and dump twice as much powder there as on the eastern side of the range (more than 500 inches annually). As a result, Targhee’s un-crowded and wide-open terrain is perfect for those looking to safely explore the unique experience of heading into the wilderness on skis or a snowboard. Many outfitters offer guided full-day or half-day tours customized to match the fitness level and needs of participants and include instruction on backcountry techniques, safety practices and more. 

Secret Yellowstone: Backcountry Camping

Yellowstone National Park encompasses 2.2 million acres, which means there’s way more to discover beyond Old Faithful, Mammoth and the North Geyser Basin. Backcountry camping is arguably the best way to experience the most popular national park in America away from the crowds, with plenty of trails and a designated backcountry campsite system. Visitors can join an off-the-beaten-path camping pack trip offered by a local outfitter, or explore on their own areas such as Yellowstone Lake (one of the world’s largest freshwater lakes above 7,000 feet elevation), Canyon Village, Hellroaring Creek and Yellowstone River. 
It’s a Yurt Spurt!

Filling a gap between roughing it in a tent and staying in an RV, yurts have increased in popularity at campgrounds nationwide. These circular lodgings are often built with wooden or canvas walls and offer a surprising amount of coziness against the elements. Often large enough to sleep five or six people, yurts typically are furnished with beds, so there’s no need to lug around air mattresses or bulky cots. Vacationing in a yurt provides the perfect amount of rustic experience, particularly for those new to the outdoors, without the hassle of setting up a tent for the night.

Yurts are a great way to add a unique twist to any Wyoming vacation, allowing travelers to escape the crowds and truly experience what it’s like to spend time in the backcountry. Many outfitters offer trips ranging from a couple days to a week, but most will accommodate any schedule travelers are interested in. Additionally, the comfort of yurts, particularly those that are heated, means travelers can take a camping trip any time of the year. So while the weather may not be as appealing in the winter, the campgrounds and surrounding towns will be quieter, offering a different type of vacation experience.

Skiing Jackson Hole and Grand Targhee backcountry

Jackson Hole is usually associated with the ski resort, but it’s actually a valley encompassed by the Teton Mountains and occupied mostly by the Grand Teton National Park, which lies in the heart of Jackson Hole. Abundant wildlife make the area a favorite tourist destination, and the steep, challenging terrain of the mountains – including one of North America’s highest vertical drop of 1,262 meters – draws many skiers and boarders. Visitors enjoy plenty of other outdoor activities in both the winter and summer, including dog sledding, snowshoeing, snowmobiling, balloon rides, paragliding, fishing, hiking, biking and mountain climbing. Visit www.jacksonhole.com for more information on Jackson Hole skiing and other outdoor adventures. Media Contact:  Anna Cole: 307-739-2704, anna.cole@jacksonhole.com

Powder hounds looking to escape the lifts and noise of Jackson won’t find a more exciting way to experience backcountry skiing and snowboarding than in Wyoming’s untracked slopes in Grand Targhee. Located on the western side of the Tetons and an hour’s drive from Jackson, Targhee gets more snow than almost any other resort in the country – and there isn’t a single snowmaking machine on the mountain. Storms traveling eastward from the Pacific often get “stuck” on the west side of the massive Tetons and dump twice as much powder there as on the eastern side of the range (more than 500 inches annually). As a result, Targhee’s un-crowded and wide-open terrain is perfect for those looking to safely explore the unique experience of heading into the wilderness on skis or a snowboard. Many outfitters offer guided full-day or half-day tours customized to match the fitness level and needs of participants and include instruction on backcountry techniques, safety practices and more. Visit www.grandtarghee.com for more info. Media Contact: Ken Rider: 307-353-2300 ext. 1312, krider@grandtarghee.com 


Secret Yellowstone: Backcountry Camping

Yellowstone National Park encompasses 2.2 million acres, which means there’s way more to discover beyond Old Faithful, Mammoth and the North Geyser Basin. Backcountry camping is arguably the best way to experience the most popular national park in America away from the crowds, with plenty of trails and a designated backcountry campsite system. Visitors can join an off-the-beaten-path camping pack trip offered by a local outfitter, or explore on their own areas such as Yellowstone Lake (one of the world’s largest freshwater lakes above 7,000 feet elevation), Canyon Village, Hellroaring Creek and Yellowstone River.

Visit Yellowstone National Park: http://www.nps.gov/yel Media Contact for YNP: Al Nash, 307-344-2105, al_nash@nps.gov or Yellowstone National Park Lodges: http://www.yellowstonenationalparklodges.com/ Media Contact: Mona Mesereau (Mesereau Public Relations) 720-852-521, mona@mesereaupr.com 


It’s a Yurt Spurt!

Filling a gap between roughing it in a tent and staying in an RV, yurts have increased in popularity at campgrounds nationwide. These circular lodgings are often built with wooden or canvas walls and offer a surprising amount of coziness against the elements. Often large enough to sleep five or six people, yurts typically are furnished with beds, so there’s no need to lug around air mattresses or bulky cots. Vacationing in a yurt provides the perfect amount of rustic experience, particularly for those new to the outdoors, without the hassle of setting up a tent for the night. A well developed yurt-to-yurt winter camping system near Evanston extends over a wide swath of trails. Media Contact: Joe Wright: 307-789-7588 



Mentioned in this article.

You might also like...